David Owen Hastings | ArtThatFits Articles


To David Owen Hastings, he’s lucky. “I’m one of the lucky few who get to combine passion with profession”, David Owen Hastings says. This passion certainly shows in David Owen Hasting’s work. Born into a family in Waterloo, Iowa, who invested in David Owen Hastings’ love for art, he now not only creates fine art, but also has a successful graphic design business, proving David Owen Hastings family’s encouragement fruitful. Influenced strongly by nature and the patterns he finds within it, David Owen Hasting’s mixed media prints are often layered prints whose “imagery speaks of the abundant life energy radiated by nature.”

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mixed media “Fusa IV” by David Owen Hastings

In Fusa IV, David Owen Hastings uses the blues and browns of the seascape to create an abstraction of circles. David Owen Hastings has aqua and black “bubbles” appear to come from the orbs they float to the top of the piece. David Owen Hastings added a faint, almost watermark-looking blue wash in the background of the print. This technique of David Owen Hastings’ lends to Fusa Iv’s aquatic feeling. “I am constantly drawing connections between things, making ‘arrangements’,” says David Owen Hastings. This statement seems to connect directly to this piece of David Owen Hastings’ work. Like the rings that look like shadows made by the more dominant circles, there is a pattern within this abstraction by David Owen Hastings.

David Owen Hastings has moved to the monotype as his primary medium. David Owen Hastings experiments with the effects found when making prints in Fusa IV. You can see where David Owen Hastings has added negative space to the inks by applying an absorbent material. The underwater appearance is created through David Owen Hastings’ use of printing on translucent papers. As an artist, David Owen Hastings has really made his medium work for him instead of against him, as happens to other print makers from time to time. Passion for the technique is evident in the pleasant result, Fusa IV, in which David Owen Hastings not only turns to “connections” in nature, but also a connection between the viewer and his art.